A Poem by ALEXJLOCKWOOD


Author: ALEXJLOCKWOOD
Created: May 18, 2017 at 03:03 pm
Upload Type: Poem, G (All)  
Category: Mythology | Cultural | General/Other
Upload Stats: 4.64 Stars by 7 users with 7 comments and 105 views

Hymn To The Rising Sun  

No automatic alt text available.

A en-ek, Ra!
Tua ren-et,
pa ankh-ta,
pa ari-khet.

Uab sekhem-ek
am neteru.
Uab ba-ek
am khu.

Pau aarut ent pet
aha ne-k
as uben-ek
em khut abtet.

Em kekiu
nu neter-khert
per-ek neb heru,
per tu ent Bakhu,
kheper-tesef, aqeru,
en akhem-ek.

Her sati ses-ek;
ta-ek maa-tu
em neb hen-ek;
uttai-ek em sesu;
maan-en-ek nebu
pa ta sehet-ek,
neter aa, em satet-ek.

Suten hert,
neb heru,
khu-ek
em en rekhit;
ast em au
en maa-ek.
Menekh-ek
sehet sen ibu
tua-ek.


{Alternative final verse:

Suten hert,
neb heru,
khu-ek
em en rekhit.
Ast em au
en maa-ek.
Menekh-ek
ari hati-sen
tua sesep-ek aten.}

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++
English Translation

Hail to thee, Ra!
Praised be thy name,
the life-giver,
the maker of things.

Pure is thy power
among the gods.
Pure is thy soul
among the spirits.

The doors
of Heaven
stand open unto thee
when thou riseth
upon the eastern horizon.

From the darkness
of the underworld
thou cometh forth each day,
from the Mountain of Bakhu,
self-created, perfect,
in your sacred form.

Over the threshold you pass;
thou letteth thyself be seen
in all thy majesty;
thine eyes are open widely,
and thou looketh upon all;
the Earth thou lighteth up,
great god, with thy beams.

King of Heaven,
Lord of the day,
thy glory
is upon the people.
The multitude is joyful
at the sight of thee;
thy benevolence
maketh their hearts
worship thee.

{Alternative final verse:

King of Heaven,
Lord of the day,
thy glory
is upon the people.
The multitude is joyful
at the sight of thee.
Thy benevolence
maketh their hearts
worship the radiance of thy disk.}



Last Modified: May 25, 2017 at 03:19 am
© ALEXJLOCKWOOD - all rights reserved

Author Notes


This is the first poem I have ever penned (18-19 and 23-24/05/2017) in Ancient Egyptian. For inspiration, and reference, I read the Adoration of Re/Litany of Re (where the image comes from) and Hymn to Ra as He Rises. Both can be found in versions of the Theban Book of the Dead (more correctly, The Book of Going Forth By Day).

It wasn't easy, as Ancient Egyptian is a phonetic language that lacks vowels. So each modern transliteration of these texts varies slightly. I think it was a guttural dialect, being pronounced mostly at the back of the throat, like Arabic.

Mountain of Bakhu - The Egyptians believed the heavens were supported by two mountains, Bakhu, on the eastern horizon, and Manu on the western horizon.



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Comments & Reviews ( X 14)



M-Uselli
May 22, 2017
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Gosh! This is quite tongue-twisting, my dear! This is both talk and walk like an Egyptian (love the Bangles, btw). Thank goodness for you translation and notes. I find your writes really quite an education.

Best wishes, Anna x
applaudapplaud



(Author)

It was an education to write them, my dear Anna! As I had not closely looked at Egyptian funerary texts closely, until now. They are strange and evocative, and embody the full range of their beliefs. I have learnt a lot. 


Namaste, Alex x


 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 24, 2017




MySongStar
May 20, 2017
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You have said that Ancient Egyptians used only consonants, and that the transliterations of their texts are very much the interpretations of 'modern' scholars. Even so, this is no mean feat for anyone, to write in a language that has not been spoken or written in thousands of years. Especially, as you say that the texts are prose, not poetry. So well done, my friend, for even attempting to convert the language into verse.
applaudapplaudapplaud



(Author)

Because of this, transliterations from the hieroglyphs into Latinised text , varies from book to book, as no two Egyptologists seem to agree.  This is particularly frustrating with names, especially those of kings and queens. There are those scholars who, even in our time, still use the Greek versions of Egyptian names, for people and places. I find that useful for comparison purposes, but a nuisance otherwise. As you are left trying to identify the Egyptian original. 


The Egyptians, like the Greeks and Romans, don't seem to have written poetry in forms that we would recognise. They are more like prose - not even 'blank verse'. So the challenge is to transform Egyptian passages into verse. This is not an easy task, though Ancient Egyptian is quite a flexible language as to word arrangement. 

Thank you very much, my friend. Namaste, Alex.


 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 22, 2017




michaelgallatin
May 19, 2017
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This took some study,...
time and hard work! Hence the five for both that and the beauty of the poem. Thank you for the English translation. And so very odd but pleasant that I found this upon a day when I am wearing an ankh. I have worn them on and off since my college days a very long time ago. The symbol for everlasting life. The Romans took off the top oval making their cross a T. Then the Christians added back a top piece again. I always found that interesting how this occurred. At any rate it a beautiful symbol of love and peace and this is a fine and masterful poem my friend! Well worthy of the spotlight I have put in for!

Namaste,
Mike
applaud



(Author)
It did indeed, my friend! I have been studying Ancient Egypt since childhood (won't say how long ago that is ). But have yet to see the fabulous sites of that great civilisation. The Ancient Egyptian language does have a strange beauty about it, which says much about that culture's thinking and beliefs. I have - in my house - imagery and statuary from a number of different cultures. As well as items of jewellery. I feel as though I am living in a museum, not to mention a library! My Beloved has got used to this eccentricity.  I have given up trying to dust! 

The Ankh/Tau Cross was such a universal symbol, and made its way into the earliest world maps (as a geographical T-O). 

Thank you very much for your thoughtful review. 
Namaste, Alex.

 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 19, 2017




Elenora
May 19, 2017
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Being Italian, I naturally love being in the Sun. So thank you for penning this piece. I find sunrises so romantic, and I often see them, as I get up early! I am not familiar with Egyptian writings. The cadence is interesting, and as Justin says, quite something when you read it out loud. You have inspired me to look more into that culture.

Vi auguriamo una piacevole giornata. I migliori auguri,
Elenora x
applaudapplaud



(Author)
Our weather is very hit and miss at the moment, my dear Elenora. We seem to be getting a lot of rain, and seeing very little sun. I hope we get a summer this year! I love sunrises - as I get up early too. But we are lucky to see them without cloud cover of some kind. Thank you very much. I am glad that I have been able to. I have been studying Ancient Egypt since childhood - most of my life, in fact. Though I have never seen the sites at first hand. It is a dream of mine to be able to visit the temples, pyramids, tombs, etc...

La ringrazio molto e vorrei augurare a voi la stessa. Siete davvero i benvenuti, mia cara. Alessandro x

 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 19, 2017




JustinCase
May 19, 2017
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My goodness, this is quite an achievement. Well done, my friend. Reading your comments on other reviews, I see the Ancient Egyptian language had no vowels. I am glad that your write has them in, otherwise it would be harder to pronounce than it is already! Thank you for the translation, which is quite poetic in its own way.
applaudapplaudapplaud



(Author)
Thank you very much, Justin. Without vowels, and lacking punctuation, the language is difficult to read! The orientation of the hieroglyphs shows the direction texts are meant to be read, though. I had the most trouble with the grammatical endings of words - masculine, feminine, plurals, etc, and tenses (past, present, etc). I had the same problem when I studied modern foreign languages. But found them easier to speak than to write, as it was a case of learning by rote. 

 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 19, 2017




SketerMichaels
May 18, 2017
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Very interesting
I've written a little in Spanish and impressed myself but to do something in ancient Egyptian??? That's quite a scholarly feat! Akhenaten would be proud. The ancient Egyptian seems to have a rhyme to it. I'm just curious if the verse written during the period had any sort of rhyme or scheme? How much of the actual pronunciation were they able to deduce off the Rosetta Stone, or is it all just a guess? This is pretty cool! Anyway, it's good to see you back and posting Alex!
applaudapplaudapplaud



(Author)

Thank you very much, my friend, it was quite an undertaking! This is the first time I have penned anything in Ancient Egyptian. It's a strange guttural language, as it's phonetic, and lacks vowels. I think it was pronounced mainly from the back of the throat, like Arabic.  The Egyptian funerary texts, when transliterated into English, vary from publication to publication as a result. They are formulaic incantations that are meant to be recited, not read. Technically, they are prose, not poetry, and quite wordy. So turning passages from these texts into poetry isn't easy.


The Rosetta Stone is in three languages: Greek, hieroglyphic Egyptian, and hieratic Egyptian. The Greek was the key to unlocking the other two. Some Egyptologists - and this irritates me - still use the Greek forms of Egyptian names, especially royal ones. I am trying to find the Egyptian forms of the names of gods and goddesses, as the Greek ones sound equally inauthentic. 


 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 19, 2017


(Author)
PS: with reference to Akhenaten - who I think was a visionary - I have included a mention of the Aten in the alternative final verse

 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 19, 2017




fraido
May 18, 2017
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Expected
Religious words follow a similar tone where platitudes follow platitudes.

I respect the belief, but as a poem it lacks originality and premise. There's no doubt you have skills as a writer and I look forward to reading more of your work.



(Author)
The Ancient Egyptian language is phonetic, and lacked vowels in its original form. So the modern transliterations of sacred texts do vary in the way they are written.  Ancient sacred texts are formulaic, because they are meant to be recited, not simply read. This is why Egyptian funerary texts are technically prose in form, and not poetry. They are incantations to aid the passage of the deceased through the afterlife, safely into the next world. Thus, turning passages from these texts into a poem isn't easy.

 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 19, 2017


One profound word as to this post Alex, BULLSHIT! I'm not religious at all in the traditional sense of the word. I have gone in my life from Christian to Agnostic to Humanist/Spiritualist. I hope there is a God but I remain unsure judging by Mankind and this world we live in. That said and from not accepting one religion I respect them all so long as they preach of a benevolent higher power and being decent to your fellow men and women. This poem (it could stand as one I think) may lack "originality" as stated. But if so, this is only because it is respective of a religion and a language that are both ancient. As far as premise goes "fraido" is way off the mark. A premise is defined as a proposition supporting a conclusion. The proposition here is that there is a god/God and the conclusion it points to is that this god/God is benevolent, beautiful and worth worshiping. Sadly there's always one in the bunch that misses the worth of a fine write! Keep up your good work Sir!

Namaste,
Mike

 michaelgallatin replied on May 19, 2017


Alex - Thanks for the clarity on the piece which aids the reader and from which we learn more about the poem and the poet. My review was respectfully meant and your response to same was respectfully received.

Michael - I'll stay where I am with my original review, if that's ok with you Comrade. From here on in though I'll submit my comments for your approval first, now that you're The Man. If I've missed anything it's your assessment of my thoughts, no hang on actually I've missed nothing at all. Who are you again?

 fraido replied on May 19, 2017


(Author)

When I was a kid, my parents made my sister and I go to church and Sunday school. (We were both baptised Church of England, btw.) Mum and Dad weren't particularly religious (Dad calls himself a ''lapsed Catholic"), so they never joined us. Typical. It was because Mum wished to keep her mother (a practising Catholic) happy. Our late gran chose the family home, I suspect, because it is near a church, so there was no excuse for sis and I to say: ''it's too far"! After gran died, sis and I turned to our parents and said we weren't going any more. They quickly got over that, as they probably knew we weren't keen anyway. 


Since then, things have happened in my life - for good and for bad - that have caused me to rethink. Though I still don't see myself as religious, I do believe in some Higher Divine Power. But my beliefs, in the main, are more 'spiritual'. They combine different faiths, thanks to my life experiences, but seem to work for me. Because of this, I am generally tolerant of the beliefs of others. Re Ancient Egypt, that great civilisation has fascinated me since childhood. So I have many books on the subject, and try to watch and read as much on it as I can. One day, I will go to Egypt, and see the sites 'for real'....

Thank you, Michael, for you comments, they are much appreciated. You are very welcome, Fraido. 


Namaste, Alex. 


 ALEXJLOCKWOOD replied on May 22, 2017




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